Lake Bemidji’s boardwalk through the bog

When we were “up north” for Memorial Day, a bog-walking program complete with a “roving naturalist” and a pancake breakfast at the dining hall enticed us to spend a Sunday at Lake Bemidji State Park. We had been to this park once before, five years ago, but I had forgotten how neat it is.

boardwalk zigzagging back and forth

A bog is a fragile ecosystem, and this sign warns people to stay on the boardwalk to not hurt the plants.

If you feel the urge to leave the beaten path, this is not the place to do it.

The boardwalk is only a quarter-mile long, but it seems much longer – probably because there is so much to see along the way that it’s a pretty slow journey. There are helpful signs along the way:

What is a bog? sign with several paragraphs, maps, and definitions of different types of wetlands

Many plants thrive in this bog environment:

At the end of the boardwalk is Big Bog Lake. We even saw a loon! (But it’s not that dot in this photo.)

a lake obscured with a few pine trees, with many more on the opposite side

The rest of the park was nice, too – on paved paths…

green hardwood trees lining a narrow paved path

…and on unpaved paths.

grassy trail through green trees

Hey! A Minnesota state park with signs that identify where you are! (See the “N” at the top, which corresponds to a spot on the map.) This works much better than an unlabeled sign with a sticker marking the spot on the map – I’ve seen so many of those that have had their stickers removed. Now, if they would add signs along the trail crossings that confirm which direction you’re heading, like Lebanon Hills does, it would be practically perfect.

directional sign at the edge of a path

Lots of interpretative signs in this part of the park, too, though they could use an upgrade. Did you know that earthworms are an invasive species that is hurting our hardwood forests? Counterintuitive, isn’t it? But true. Don’t dump your leftover bait, anywhere!

We have always been told that earthworms are good for nature, but ecologists now say they don't even belong in MN.

Such a great touch: the wildflower signs include both English and Ojibwe names.

small orange flowers with a sign reading Hoary Puccoon and ojiibik-omaman

I don’t often see starflowers in our neck of the woods:

white flower with seven petals

We admired the Works Progress Administration buildings, like the dining hall…

brown log building with a ramp up to the door

…where we were served pancakes and sausages and teeny glasses of orange juice.

recyclable plate with plastic silverware, two sausages, and two pancakes

We also saw Lake Bemidji, naturally:

lake with a sandy beach on a cloudy day

And signs along the entrance road ask motorists to be careful because baby foxes are in the area:

Slow!!! Kits at play! and a drawing of a fox

After this fun visit, I added this park to my top five favorites of all the Minnesota state parks I’ve seen so far.

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Date visited: May 29, 2016

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